American Vignette: Call for Submissions

May 10, 2014 § 8 Comments

headshotvignette (vɪˈnjɛt) – n.
1. a small illustration placed at the beginning or end of a book or chapter
2. a short graceful literary essay or sketch

Reader, blogger, and creative nonfiction essayist Andrea Badgley is seeking submissions for American Vignette: Show Us Your State, a creative nonfiction component of her Andrea Reads America project.

What she wants:

In fewer than 800 words – in a “short graceful literary essay or sketch” – describe a scene that captures a sense of place in your home state (home may be your childhood home, your current home, or anywhere in between). The sense of place may be evoked through landscape, food, culture, ecology, colloquialisms, or any distinctive element of the state you call home. Your vignette must be set in a state you have lived for a minimum of three months. Diversity is a core value of the Andrea Reads America project, so authors of all genders, colors, and heritages are encouraged to submit. Previously published work is welcome.

Full submission guidelines can be found here.

River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize Series Returns

April 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

straydAfter a one-year hiatus, the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize Series returns in full force, with a new publisher and a series judge.

Beginning this fall, the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize will be published by the University of New Mexico Press. Series Co-Editors, Dan Lehman and Joe Mackall, will continue to screen all manuscripts submitted to the contest, and Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild, Tiny Beautiful Things, and Torch, and 2013 guest editor of the Best American Essays, will serve as the final judge.

The deadline for this year’s contest is October 15, 2014. Winners will be announced in January 2015, and the winning manuscript will be published the following spring, 2016.

FULL GUIDELINES CAN BE FOUND HERE.

On Literary Editing and the Nature of Love

April 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

rtOur friend Dan Lehman at River Teeth offers a comprehensive, nuanced, and honest look at how editors make their  decisions, with helpful detail on River Teeth‘s active and intuitive process. Here is an excerpt, followed by a link to the whole article:

Fifteen years into this journey, an important thing readers should know about River Teeth is that its two editors once worked at magazines and newspapers where we shaped content and nurtured writers. Hence our love for factual writing that soars in interesting ways. Beyond that, we love clustering great essays and literary reporting into the soul and rhythm of each issue … At heart we always ask two questions: Is this the sort of piece I would want to call the other editor in the middle of the night to say we have to have? And would we die if we saw this piece in someone else’s journal and knew we could have had it for ourselves? Those are the criteria, nothing else really. As we wrote a few issues ago, we will publish the work of friends and acquaintances (even ourselves) if it meets those standards. Only then. That’s all. That our two Best American essays come from writers with close ties makes our case. Both were among the best dozen or so essays in this or any other year; it would have killed us to see them win those prizes for someone else. And we confessed that fact in writing before the prizes were won.

We know all this sounds more than a little intuitive, even presumptuous, and quite a bit less than arm’s length. That’s the nature of love, we guess.

Read Dan Lehman’s full explanation here.

Sonora Wants Essays, Nonfiction, and Hybrids

April 2, 2014 § Leave a comment

Jenny Boully

Jenny Boully

Deadline: May 15th, 2014

Judge: Jenny Boully
What We Want: Essays, nonfiction, and hybrids of up to 6,000 words
Prize: Winner receives $1,000 and publication in Issue 66 of Sonora Review; all other finalists will be considered for publication

Bellingham Nonfiction Deadline Extended

March 31, 2014 § 1 Comment

dillardThe Bellingham Review‘s Annie Dillard Award in Creative Nonfiction 2014

Deadline extended to April 1!

$1000 first place award; finalists also considered for publication.

Final Judge: Joy Castro

http://www.bhreview.org/2014-contest-submissions-guidelines/

 

Submit to Stonecoast

March 31, 2014 § Leave a comment

toolStonecoast Review is looking for submissions.  Creative nonfiction especially welcomed.

Full guidelines here and abridged below.

What We Want:

We welcome writing in the genres of creative nonfiction, fiction, popular (genre) fiction, and poetry. The editorial staff of Stonecoast Review seeks exciting work from both new and established writers. Our goal is to publish innovative and deeply resonant literature that embodies our core values of social and environmental justice, cultural awareness, and international perspectives. We especially want unique, powerful writing that takes chances and brings the reader to entirely unexpected places.

Proximity: A Quarterly Collection of True Stories

March 11, 2014 § 2 Comments

pBy Towles Kintz

In the fall of 2008, when I was knee-deep in new motherhood, I received an unexpected opportunity. Maggie Messitt, a friend of mine from graduate school, wanted to know if I’d join her and another Goucher grad, Carrie Kilman, on a literary adventure of sorts.

The plan was for the three of us to launch a blog that would celebrate both the diversity of the world around us and our inherent interconnectedness. We would choose one location or point in time (bus stop, library, evening) and spend an hour there, resulting in a blog filled with immersion and personal essays that would become Proximity.

At the time, Maggie lived in South Africa and worked as a narrative journalist. Carrie had recently moved from Montgomery, Alabama, to Madison, Wisconsin, where she freelanced her way through a new city, and I lived in Atlanta and had mostly surrendered my writing life and aspirations to the beguiling work of motherhood.

Each of us sought connection in our own way.

For me, Proximity became a beautiful little lifeline; it was not only an opportunity to reflect and write at a time in my life when reflection, much less writing, was at a minimum, but it also gave me a window to the world during what was an otherwise isolating season of life. When all three of our essays posted, it felt like magic. Each was unique to the author’s perspective, narrative voice and experience, but underlined a sort of universal understanding of and appreciation for one another. The project lasted a year.

Then, in the summer of 2013, Maggie called me again. She wanted to know what I thought about reviving Proximity, but this time as an online literary magazine. Again, each issue would be theme-based. We would choose nine submissions – including flash, mid-range, long form and multi-media – and publish once a quarter. To help elevate this new take on an old idea and build a digital publication that would stand the test of time, we invited Traci Macnamara to join our cross-country editorial team. Together we span rural and urban, southern and northern, Appalachian college town and mountainous ski village.

And so, Proximity was re-born, but this time with greater reach and more varied perspectives. We launched our first quarterly collection of true stories in January with the theme Morning, and in it you’ll find some real gems – offering readers a layered, unqualified rendering of mornings spent in introspection, in observation, and at work. And, just as we sought years ago, we found a single theme through which to highlight our great connections and vast differences around the world, from Antarctica and Botswana to Tennessee and Maine.

This expanded format serves to amplify what our original team started. In an age where connecting so often happens with the help of technology, the stories we publish offer serious grounding in a place or time that may be very different from our own. It is also somehow relatable, and in being relatable serves to foster greater understanding and connectedness in a world that sometimes seems as small as the little devices stuck to our palms.

As a former contributor to Brevity, I would like to invite you, readers and writers of true stories, to submit to Proximity’s upcoming issues (themed: Crossroads, Stuff, Wilderness). For guidelines, or to read our stellar writers’ work in Issue #1, visit www.proximitymagazine.org.

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