We Like to Read

June 2, 2010 § 13 Comments


Do you like to read?

What do you like to read?

We’d love your recommendations.

Comment below.

§ 13 Responses to We Like to Read

  • Kerry Madden says:

    THE POSSESSED: ADVENTURES WITH RUSSIAN BOOKS AND THE PEOPLE WHO READ THEM by Elif Batuman
    THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF LEMON CAKE by Aimee Bender
    THE ART OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY (Philip Lopate Anthology)
    (Above is what I’m reading now, in a novel…)
    Other books I have loved in nonfiction
    BORROWED TIME by Paul Monette
    MY OWN COUNTRY by Abraham Verghese
    LIVE THROUGH THIS by Debra Gwartney
    A SUPPOSEDLY FUNNY THING I’LL NEVER DO AGAIN by David Foster Wallace
    THE YEAR OF MAGICAL THINKING, THE WHITE ALBUM…anything by Joan Didion
    IF YOU WANT TO WRITE by Brenda Ueland
    This is barely scratching the surface but yes I love to read…I also THE TRUTH OF MATTER with my creative nonfiction students at UAB, and it’s perfect for them (and me!)

  • Mike Hooker says:

    I like pretty much anything that’s well written. I lean toward first-person creative nonfiction for both reading and writing.

    I prefer reading books and magazines that I can hold rather than reading books/articles/essays online.

    • AJ Earley says:

      I like how you said, “that I can hold.”

      I totally agree

      because when you finish a piece that you truly love, you can give it a big squishy hug.

      True, you may look silly embracing a bundle of bound paper, but I assume it appears more sane that attempting to squishy hug cyberspace.

  • Jenn says:

    Isn’t it the season when everyone is supposed to be reading Swedish mystery novels? Did you miss the memo, brevity? 😉

  • Tim Elhajj says:

    Last good book I read: Nick Flynn’s, The Ticking is the Bomb. Worth a look.

    • Lorri McDole says:

      Hey Tim, I’m reading an excerpt from The Ticking is the Bomb in the 2009 Best American Nonrequired Reading anthology. Guess I need to get the book!

  • Bradley says:

    There’s no shortage of great stuff to read this summer– recent books from Eula Biss, Patrick Madden, Steven Church, and Rebecca Skloot are all on my summer reading list. There’s some fiction on that list too, but I have to say I’m much more excited about the nonfiction. I feel like, in the past two years or so, I’ve become aware of some really exciting work being done by some really exciting, relatively “emerging” writers, and I feel like it’s awesome to be able to say “I was into [insert awesome essayist/ nonfiction writer here] way before everyone else was.”

  • T. says:

    Blogs, blogs, and more blogs. I am serious blog addict.

  • Sectnet says:

    The Line by Olga Grushin. May be the best book I’ve read this year!

  • David Grover says:

    I’m just wrapping up Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

    I was expecting the amazing adventures of an early-twentieth-century pilot—some simple adventure writing, I guess—but instead the book is a long meditation on the nature of man, the purposes and possible dangers of technology, the meaning of war—all discussed through the lens of his piloting experiences. Though he has these wild stories to tell, they take second stage to his philosophizing and editing; he often forgets to even finish telling the story just to satisfy your curiosity since he’s made the point he meant to make. I’m a sucker for odd books that seem avoid the typical narrative shape given to books of a certain type, especially when the author seems clueless that there was even a type to begin with. Another example: Journal of a Disappointed Man, by W. N. P. Barbellion.

  • […] Creative Nonfiction Blog We Like to Read – Do you like to read? What do you like to read? We’d love your recommendations. Comment […]

  • […] Creative Nonfiction Blog We Like to Read – Do you like to read? What do you like to read? We’d love your recommendations. Comment […]

  • AJ Earley says:

    Anything by Steven Millhauser, “The Interrogative Mood: A Novel?” by Padgett Powell, old (old) issues of McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, and poetry that looks like HTML.

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