Wandering Aengus Press Book Awards

April 29, 2019 § 2 Comments

dandelion-2733649-1920-pixabay_origWandering Aengus Press has launched its inaugural book awards and is now accepting creative nonfiction manuscripts as well as manuscripts in fiction and poetry (and hybrids too). We will publish up to three prize winners this year. The press is dedicated to publishing works to enrich lives and make the world a better place, because why not do as much good as we can in the world with what little time we have?

The deadline to submit is May 31, 2019. The sooner you send in your manuscript, the more time our editors will have to spend with it, so for your own sake, please don’t wait til the last minute.

The Wandering Aengus editors will select the winning manuscripts, and we’ll announce the winners by September 1, 2019. The winning manuscripts will be published as perfect-bound books by Wandering Aengus Press or our imprint, Trail to Table Press, with full distribution via Ingram. Winners will receive 50 copies of their book. Authors will have input into the cover design and interior design.

Learn more and submit your best work at http://wanderingaenguspress.com/index.html.

Kiese Laymon Judges 2019 New Ohio Review Nonfiction Contest

April 12, 2019 § 1 Comment

mississippi-body2By Madison Foltz and David Wanczyk,

We are thrilled to have award-winning memoirist Kiese Laymon as the judge of our 2019 New Ohio Review nonfiction contest. The deadline is April 15. The winner will receive $1000, and this year we are happy to announce that two dozen honorable mention pieces—spread across poetry, fiction, and nonfiction—will be published either in our print magazine or online at newohioreview.org. All entrants receive a one-year subscription.

In his frank, powerful new memoir, Heavy: An American Memoir, Laymon writes about his American experience, about pains both physical and cultural. And as the memoir’s title implies, much of the book deals with Laymon’s struggles with body image.

Martha Anne Toll writes in her review of Heavy for NPR, “Laymon intersperses stories of friends and girlfriends and teachers and books with a narrative about food—both its attraction and revulsion. His body is a character in this memoir, the body of a black man, objectified by the culture, threatened and threatening because of America’s long, ugly history of racial oppression.”

Laymon explores his childhood in Jackson, Mississippi, which was filled with violence, familial betrayal, and beatings, alongside his later expulsion from Millsaps College, a gambling addiction, his eventual graduation from Oberlin, and his battle against racism. Throughout his story, he also links his own writing and struggles to those of authors like Toni Cade Bambara and Richard Wright. Like their work, Heavy is intense, powerful, important. And it’s difficult to read at times. It’s not only the story of a black male body trying to find its place in America, but also the story of all the reasons why that place may never be found. Laymon, with a pulsing, melancholic, hurt-but-indomitable voice, highlights how personal demons and toxic behavior can form a maelstrom within us that can keep us from thriving. “The nation as it is currently constituted,” he writes, “has never dealt with a yesterday or tomorrow where we were radically honest, generous, and tender with each other.”

We are excited to work with Laymon because he is offering that kind of artistic reckoning.

A professor of creative writing and English at the University of Mississippi, Kiese Laymon has authored a full-length novel, Long Division, and a collection of essays titled How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America. His reviews, essays, and stories have appeared in publications such as Vanity FairOxford American, and LitHub, among others. His writing is characterized by razor-sharp observation and reverberant-colloquial eloquence that also exposes his deepest vulnerabilities. And Heavy is an example that pulls no punches.

Please submit your pulls-no-punches essay. Your radically honest memoir. Your generous, tender-funny hybrid form. Your unignorable short-short. Laymon, we think it’s fair to say, has been through plenty. We know he will be excited to see your story.
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Madison Foltz is the New Ohio Review intern and David Wanczyk is editor of New Ohio Review.

CFP: Assay, Special Issue on Nonfictional Forms of Engagement

March 5, 2019 § Leave a comment

time-keepers-1A note and opportunity from Assay Editor-in-Chief Karen Babine:

Call for Proposals – Assay 6.2 Special Issue (Spring 2020)

  • 250-word proposals due March 15, 2019
  • Essays of 2,000-3,000 words due July 1, 2019
  • Publication: Spring 2020

Assay is thrilled to announce that our Spring 2020 issue (6.2) will be guest edited and themed around nonfictional forms, as they relate to mediated concepts of truth and reality, and with a particular hope that the texts and writers will come from outside the United States. Our guest editors are Anastasia Ulanowicz (University of Florida), Manisha Basu (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign), and Brenda Glascott (Portland State University) and speaking as Assay’s editor, I’m so excited about how they’re going to bring their conversations to our audience, with formal scholarship, informal analysis, and pedagogy. If you’re not familiar with their work, please check them out!

The theme of the issue will be significantly informed by critics such as Rob Nixon, Henry Twidle, Walter Benn Michaels, and Ian Jack, who have each accounted for a late 20th and early 21st century “boom” on the global stage of non-fictional forms of engagement. However, unlike these scholars, this special issue seeks to understand not why a particular narrative form emerges at a particular time, but what its effects are in its particular context. What, they ask, do the kinds of textual transactions that constitute the nonfictional turn have to do with what Rob Nixon has called “the cultural industrialization of the real”: who do they speak for, why do they matter, and to whom? In the face of authoritarian appropriations of reality, nonfictional textualities foreground the crucial idea that reality does not exist outside the regimes for its own production and circulation—and they demonstrate how those regimes may in fact be transformed to constitute a new politics of reality.

Global nonfiction. Forms of nonfiction. Authors of nonfiction outside the United States. India. Australia. Eastern Europe. Ireland. Graphic nonfiction. Memoir. Literary journalism. Essays.

These subjects—and their writers— have long been of interest to us at Assay and we’re so excited to spend an entire issue on them. While this issue will consider the ideas of mediated reality, we are not interested in the American arguments over truth-vs-fact. That said, we’d love to see work that challenges these ideas in other contexts.

We hope the issue investigates what we might call “a commerce of textualities” by reading literary/creative/narrative non-fictional works constituted in mixed modes of writing at the intersection of journalism, life-writing, history, urban-studies, and archival reconstruction, and technology.

As always, Assay is interested in the wide variety of how analysis of these writers and texts can happen, from formal articles, to more informal analysis suitable for our Conversations section, and nonfiction pedagogy. If you have questions or queries, please send us a note at assayjournal@gmail.com. Please share our CFP among your colleagues and students who might be writing seminar papers or conference papers as we speak.

You might consider a proposal on (but of course your idea should not be limited to what’s here)—

  • the long-standing tradition of colonial/anti-colonial travel writing (and who is doing the travel writing outside of the American tradition? Perhaps you might consider writing on Dervla Murphy or Jan Morris?)
  • the impact of Tom Wolfe and the new journalism (1970s), but you might also consider how Nellie Bly might fit into this conversation.
  • the significance for investigative journalism of the ‘history from below’ series at the University of Witwatersrand (1980s)
  • the influence of Slavenka Drakulic’s Café Europa (1996) in altering Soviet-era assumptions of the essay as a self-interested form
  • the increasing demand for a dynamics of testimony, globally, in the shadow of the HIV/AIDS crisis
  • Svetlana Alexievich’s “polyphonic writings” with the Nobel prize for literature in 2015 (she’s the first woman to win for nonfiction and we haven’t seen any submissions on her since her win—we’d like to change that).
  • the emergence of graphic memoirs and graphic reportage (e.g., Joe Sacco, Igort, and don’t miss Reshmi Mukherjee’s piece on Kate Evans from the Spring 2019 issue.)
  • the significance of epistolary forms and diaries as nonfiction forms
  • critical methodologies in archival research
  • the emergence of new approaches to Indigenous literary and cultural forms (e.g., the peoplehood matrix)
  • the pedagogy of these writers, texts, and considerations in literature classrooms, composition and rhetoric classrooms, as well as creative writing classrooms. (As always, the pedagogy needs to be analytical and based in theory, not simply lore.)

Please send proposals, including keywords and a brief bio, to Anastasia Ulanowicz (aulanow@ufl.edu) and Manisha Basu (mbasu@illinois.edu). Any questions should be sent to Karen Babine at assayjournal@gmail.com.

 

Matador Review Call for Submissions

July 6, 2018 § 1 Comment

From our Friends at The Matador Review:

summer2018coverAlternative art and literature magazine The Matador Review is now accepting submissions for the Fall 2018 publication. We publish poetry, fiction, flash fiction, and creative non-fiction, inviting all unpublished literature written in the English language (and translations that are accompanied by the original text) as well as many forms of visual art. The call for submissions will end August 31, 2018.

When asked by author Angela Yuriko Smith what we’re looking for, Editor-in-Chief JT Lachausse replied:

“We want what you haven’t seen. Allow me to be dramatic: Imagine that every piece of art is represented by a stone. Many stones make up the mountains and buildings, but even more hide beneath the surface. We are so familiar and fond of the overground rocks, but in the caves and oceans-deep, there are stories that tell things wildly. Desperately, furiously, without great laborious sanitizing or editorial puncturing.”

More information on submitting to The Matador Review can be found at our submissions page.

 

 

War & Peace: Flash

April 26, 2018 § 1 Comment

cover-seenPanorama Journal, the international journal focused on travel literature, is accepting submissions for its Summer issue, War & Peace. Panorama is looking for submissions of flash travel lit which is political. Pieces must be between 150 and 300 words after edits, and no longer than 350 words before edits. We invite short works with a story and strong sense of detail and place. Send your work to flasheditor@panoramajournal.org with the title “War & Peace: Flash”. Submissions are open until 5/17. More information on this call and others here: www.panoramajournal.org/calls/

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Call for Submissions: Matador Review and Post

April 24, 2018 § Leave a comment

pexels-photo-938960.jpeg

Alternative art and literature magazine The Matador Review is now accepting submissions for the Summer 2018 publication. We publish poetry, fiction, flash fiction, and creative non-fiction, inviting all unpublished literature written in the English language (and translations that are accompanied by the original text) as well as many forms of visual art. The call for submissions will end May 31, 2018.

We are also seeking submissions for our arts and culture corner, The Matador Post. We’re seeking articles which surround the following cultural topics: Television, Film, Music, Politics, Video Games, and Sex and Love.

The Post exists to ignite cultural discussion and share ideas from seasoned creatives. It operates as its own entity, separate from The Matador Review, yet affiliated with its core intent: to become “a cultural conservationist for the alternative world” and “advocate for a progressive attitude.” Writers should take risks that are interesting and provocative.

When asked by author Angela Yuriko Smith what we’re looking for, Editor-in-Chief JT Lachausse replied:

“We want what you haven’t seen. Allow me to be dramatic: Imagine that every piece of art is represented by a stone. Many stones make up the mountains and buildings, but even more hide beneath the surface. We are so familiar and fond of the overground rocks, but in the caves and oceans-deep, there are stories that tell things wildly. Desperately, furiously, without great laborious sanitizing or editorial puncturing.”

More information on both The Matador Review and The Post can be found at our submissions page.

Those interested in submitting to The Matador Review can send their work to editors@matadorreview.com. Those interested in submitting to The Matador Post can send their work to contact@matadorreview.com.

 

On Spry and Flashy Prose

April 20, 2018 § Leave a comment

spry-banner-trans-ish-49Not about Brevity, but about ‘brevity,’ from Elizabeth Hilts at Spry literary magazine (another flash market to consider during our submissions closure):

This might be a bit obvious, right? I mean, c’mon, “brevity” in a series on flash. Yet the fact of it must be addressed. Concise. Exact. Just the right words and only a very few of them (though that seems to be negotiable); the challenge being to express the breadth and depth of a thing fully within the constraints of brevity, to write beautifully, evocatively, to essay a specific truth without succumbing to wordiness.

Poetry does this. The constraints of form and structure seem designed to inspire precision and, by definition, poetry is concentrated. The formality of the genre creates a sort of elegant sparseness, each word “curated” in the most hipster-ish sense of the word. But flash is not poetry, flash is flash so…what? It seems easier to interrogate what flash is not than it is to define what flash is.

Flash is not merely brief, the whole endeavor is much more complex than that. Flash requires the strict attention to form required of poetry but without the illusory “comfort” of rules concerning syntax and tempo and all the rest.

Read the rest here

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