Call for Submissions: Post-Election

November 21, 2016 § Leave a comment

zz rs.jpgAs we move toward the reality of Donald Trump’s pending presidency, many artists are responding, and Rock & Sling wants to produce a cross-section of that work, to be released at AWP in D.C., two weeks after the Inauguration.

We are looking for any kind of artistic reaction to the election and the weeks that have followed. Photo-documentary, essay, allegory, graphic shorts, fiction, satire, poems, visual art: we want it. What are your fears or frustrations? Your hopes or hesitations? We want to hear from the whole spectrum, all of the kinds of reactions we see. We want to hear from undocumented artists and from Christians, from Muslims and artists of color, and from conscientious conservatives.

Rock & Sling is a journal of witness. We believe that the power of witness, of truth-telling, is a good human act and a good human outcome, enabling the reader to enter the life of another self and thus to grow in empathy, compassion, and understanding.

Submissions information can be found here:

https://rockandsling.com/2016/11/19/special-issue-call-for-submissions/

Call for Submission: Woven Tale Press

November 21, 2016 § Leave a comment

zz_wtpFrom The Woven Tale Press Editor-in-Chief Sandra Tyler:

The Woven Tale Press is an interactive online literary and fine arts magazine, and our mission is to grow traffic to noteworthy writers, photographers, and artists across the World Wide Web. By growing this Web traffic, we aspire to garner the interest of galleries and literary agents who may turn to our pages seeking new talents. Today, WTP has a combined following of 9,000 and over 2,700 site hits per month.

Since its inception in 2013, The Woven Tale Press has been through quite an evolution. While I knew it would be Web-based, my initial focus was to feature noteworthy bloggers; I had been blogging for a couple of years, and was frustrated with how quickly posts were relegated to my archives, how my Web presence was largely obscured by the vastness of cybersphere.

This obscurity on the Web can seem analogous to that of the lone writer or the artist in his studio, and for me, to my own mother; growing up, I witnessed how she persevered through self-doubts and disappointments to hone her own unique statement as a visual artist, and quite literally, in the obscurity of our cellar—The only truly bright light was a reflective one, off of a canvas, fresh paint glistening in the dull glow of a single overhead lamp. That is how I remember my mother’s paintings, quite literally luminous in an otherwise dark space.

My mother’s years of painting in that cellar can serve as an apt metaphor for what we strive for at WTP: To bring to light works by writers and artists who otherwise may be toiling away in their own “cellars.” For every artist’s or writer’s website, there is that creative soul persevering in isolation, to hone his or her own unique statement, be it on a canvas, the page, or in any other medium. And it is a perseverance often plagued with doubts: Am I any good? Am I just wasting my time?

These are age-old questions with every new rejection, and for many, these questions may go unanswered. But validation in creative endeavors is much about being seen or heard; artists and writers long for an audience, and in this digital age, recognition in cybersphere is rivaling that in the brick and mortar world. As editor-in-chief of The Woven Tale Press, I am always seeking out others toiling away, to illuminate those talents hidden in the shadows across the World Wide Web.

Besides our magazine, we have much to offer on our site: features ranging from interviews and cutting-edge videos, to book, art reviews, and even website reviews. We also offer guidelines to how to get your own website up and running within an hour — this is a prerequisite for publication in our magazine; our way of nudging serious artists and writers to develop a Web presence if they haven’t already. A must in this digital era!

Your literary nonfiction is welcome, whether it be an excerpt from a memoir or a piece of short or flash nonfiction. Like the Brevity Blog, we would also love to publish your reviews or works about your own artistic process.

Take a look at our latest issues at www.thewoventalepress.net and consider submitting at  http://www.thewoventalepress.net/how-to-submit/. Any questions can be directly to me at editor(at)thewoventalepress(dot)net.

Call for Narrative Essays: Science & Religion

November 16, 2016 § 4 Comments

galileo-galilean-satellitesA note from The Think Write Publish Science & Religion project:

As part of our effort to facilitate dialogue between these two ways of knowing the world, Creative Nonfiction and Issues in Science and Technology magazines are seeking original narratives illustrating and exploring the relationships, tensions, and harmonies between science and religion—the ways these two forces productively challenge each other as well as the ways in which they can work together and strengthen one another.

We welcome personal stories of scientists, religious figures, or (just as important) everyday people seeking to explore or reconcile their own spiritual and scientific beliefs.

Editors of both magazines will award up to $17,500 in prizes, plus publication.

With little more than a month to go before the deadline of December 12, I hope you’ll consider sending in work, as well as sharing information about this opportunity with others.

https://www.creativenonfiction.org/submissions/dialogue-between-science-religion

 

Call for Submissions: Older Queer Voices

November 15, 2016 § 9 Comments

zzstOlder Queer Voices: The Intimacy of Survival—A call for submissions in response to the harder times that have come back around.

Do you remember surreptitiously flipping through your library’s card catalog to search out who you were and finding only references to “the male homosexual” or “sexuality, aberrant” and no listings at all for gender? Did you strain to hear when your parents lowered their voices to talk about “those” women who lived together in a house at the end of the block? Do you remember the closet? Do remember the Johns Committee? How about the Reagan era when access to women’s, to all people’s, healthcare was curtailed, people with disabilities lost access to key services, and the AIDS crisis emerged?

Those of us who survived these years can help recreate the edifices of care and activism that we once constructed for ourselves and then perhaps abandoned because they were no longer needed. It’s time to reach back and get them. Our experience, the successes we had, the mistakes we made, the voices of those who were left out, and the ways we thrived can be added to the already formidable power of younger generations of queer folk as we gather together in resistance.

Co-editors Sarah Einstein and Sandra Gail Lambert are looking for creative nonfiction and poetry for an online anthology to launch shortly after President Trump is sworn into office. Tell us your stories of not only what you survived, but especially the particular mechanisms of how you found your “people” and the ways you supported and celebrated each other.

Submission Details:

Older Queer Voices: The Intimacy of Survival

Co-edited by Sarah Einstein and Sandra Gail Lambert

An online anthology scheduled for release in early spring.

Creative nonfiction and poetry. No upper or lower word limits. Previously published pieces accepted but the author must own the rights

Deadline: As soon as possible. January 10th at the latest.

Possible AWP reading.

Submit to: olderqueervoices@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

Call for Essays Examining the Nonfiction of Social Justice

November 14, 2016 § 5 Comments

A note from Karen Babine, editor of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies:

zzstOn Wednesday morning, we, like many of you, had no idea how to walk into our classrooms, what to say to our students. The results of the election were paralyzing to many of us. Many of us are still paralyzed. It was a Facebook post from a friend that got me there: “Educators, get out of bed. We have work to do.” My Wednesday composition class’s plan to talk about Aristotle’s Three Appeals seemed beyond ridiculous. So, like many of you, I scrapped my lesson plan, but I was in class with my students at my urban community college in the north suburbs of Minneapolis. I’m still struggling to find words—in class this week, I couldn’t even finish my sentences and my students just looked at me and nodded. They didn’t have words either. In that space, I relied on the words of others to fill that void.

Writers: we have work to do.

This week, the Assay staff decided that while we would still like to have a focus on Best American Essays in our spring issue (to continue our celebration of BAE’s 30th anniversary), we would like to fill our pages with the nonfiction of social justice. We’re looking for full scholarly articles, we’re looking for informal analysis, we’re looking for pedagogy of all sorts, the incredible variety of forms that Assay likes best. We’re looking for the voices we need now, more than ever. Who are the writers of color we need to read (and teach), now more than ever? The LGBTQ writers we need, now more than ever? The environmental writers, as we struggle against the future incarnations of the EPA? Who are the other voices about to be marginalized even further? What are the particular texts, the individual essays, the full-length books? What lesson plans have you developed? Perhaps an explication of a nonfiction assignment? What did you read with your students this week when you tossed out your original plan?

Assay’s spring issue comes out in March, a few weeks after AWP in Washington, DC, which is a few weeks after Inauguration Day. In the face of feeling helpless and powerless, putting our words into the world to support each other is our best way of moving forward.

Please share this call widely with your colleagues and students.

Writers: We have work to do.

Get it on the Radio: Pitching

September 6, 2016 § 3 Comments

Star pitcher of the Brevity baseball team. Next week we play Tin House.

Star pitcher of the Brevity baseball team. Next week we play Tin House.

Right now, podcasts are a thing. Podcasts about accused murderers, about science, about old Hollywood. And many, many podcasts about personal stories. Ever listen to This American Life or The Moth and thought, I have a story that would be great for that show?

You probably do.

So what’s the process? How does the story get from your head (or the essay you already wrote) to the airwaves?

First, listen to the show(s) you want to be on. Different programs have very different styles and subject matter, and the story that’s perfect for Risk! is going to be terrible for Radio Ambulante. If a program is broadcast on the radio rather than solely on the internet, they have FCC restrictions on language and content. Some shows have a presentation component, where the first step is showing up at a live show and sharing your story in front of an audience (eek!).

Then think about your story, and whether it’s right for radio. As it happens, most of the points that make a good podcast story are the same things that make a good essay. On their pitch page, This American Life says:

…each of these stories is a story in the most traditional sense: there are characters in some situation, and a conflict. These pitchers are clear about who the characters are and what the conflict is. Also: each of these stories raises some bigger question or issue, some universal thing to think about. That’s also pretty important, and you stand a better chance at getting on the air if you let us know what that is too.

Radio stories are sold with a “pitch.” Instead of sending a whole story, you craft a pitch email–it’s a lot like a query letter–and submit your idea. At Transom, a site with hundreds of resources for radio storytellers and independent producers, Ari Daniel gets even more in-depth with seven tips for successful pitches, including:

Pitching a story about a generic idea — a group of people losing money on their subprime mortgages, say — isn’t nearly as effective as finding one or two people experiencing that issue who can illustrate the broader idea.

…If there’s any reason why the story needs to be aired soon, mention that. This is called a news peg.

…Don’t worry about chasing press releases and embargoed about-to-be published studies. It’s likely that staff journalists will cover these. I like to look for stories that aren’t yet on the news radar. In fact, most of my story ideas emerge out of casual conversations.

If you’re feeling like a total beginner (which is a great place to start) Youth Radio breaks it down for teens, and it sure helped me navigate at the beginning. That page has a great interview with Radiolab’s Robert Krulwich, too.

Snap Judgment even has a handy flowchart to see if you have a story (scroll down on the linked page).

Most of the shows that accept pitches have very specific and detailed guidelines. It may be challenging to structure your story to fit their mold, but it’s not hard to find the instructions. In learning to pitch, I found two things incredibly helpful:

  1. As an exercise, I listened to podcasts I wanted to be on and wrote pitches for the stories I heard on the air. This helped me identify characters, conflict, bigger issue, and see how stories were structured for particular shows.
  2. I downloaded archived sessions from the Third Coast International Audio Festival. Each year their conference includes Getting to Yes: The Art of the Pitch, and listening to people pitch their ideas to radio producers, and the producers picking them apart (kindly) helped me understand what does and doesn’t make a story. After you’ve listened to two or three sessions, you’ll start saying, “No! That’s not a story! But if you came at it from this angle…” before the pitcher even finishes their spiel.

Another great resource on story structure is This American Life’s Radio: An Illustrated Guide. It’s a $2 PDF download, and it’s so useful an approach to “what makes a story,” I think you should get it even if you never want to be on the radio.

On Thursday, I’ll be back here on the Brevity blog to talk about the process of actually presenting and/or taping. Meanwhile, check out some pitch guidelines, and see if one of these shows is the right match for your story.

Snap Judgment

This American Life (it’s a treasure trove including sample pitches that succeeded)

The Moth (with a link to tips for telling live stories)

Radio Ambulante

AIR’s pitching page, with links to many shows and how-to-pitch resources

Happy storytelling!

_______________________________________

Allison Williams is Brevity’s Social Media Editor, and has appeared on The Moth GrandSLAM, Snap Judgment, and CBC’s Love Me and Definitely Not the Opera, among others. She’ll be hosting the upcoming Brevity podcast.

The 2016 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose

July 1, 2016 § 7 Comments

28-1From our friends at Gulf Coast:

Gulf Coast is now accepting entries for the 2016 Barthelme Prize for Short Prose. The contest is open to pieces of prose poetry, flash fiction, and micro-essays of 500 words or fewer. Established in 2008, the contest awards its winner $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions receive $250 and will also appear in issue 29.2, due out in April 2017. All entries will be considered for paid publication on our website as online exclusives.

Jim Shepard will judge this year’s contest. Shepard has written seven novels, including The Book of Aron, published in 2015, which won the Sophie Brody Medal for Excellence in Jewish Literature and the PEN/New England Award for Fiction, and four story collections, including Like You’d Understand, Anyway, a finalist for the National Book Award and Story Prize winner.  His previous novel, Project X, won the Library of Congress/Massachusetts Book Award for Fiction as well as the ALEX Award from the American Library Association.  His short fiction has appeared in, among other magazines, Harper’s, McSweeney’s, The Paris Review, The Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, The New Yorker, Granta, Zoetrope: All-Story, Playboy, and Electric Literature, he’s won a Guggenheim Fellowship, five of his stories have been chosen for the Best American Short Stories, two for the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, and one for a Pushcart Prize.   He teaches creative writing and film at Williams College.

Entries are due August 31, 2016. The $18 entry fee includes a year-long subscription to Gulf Coast.

We will accept submissions both via our online submissions manager and via postal mail.  Visit https://gulfcoastmag.org/contests/barthelme-prize/ for more information,.

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