Brevity Podcast #3 Rick Moody and Athena Dixon

December 12, 2016 § 1 Comment

vintage-bakelite-radio-green_small2jpg2It’s time once again for the Brevity Podcast! Listen right from this post, or click over to iTunes, Soundcloud or Stitcher. If you’re subscribed, we’ll show up in your podcast app queue. And wherever you listen or download us, please take a moment to leave a brief review–it helps us show up in searches and recommendations.

Episode #3 features an interview with Rick Moody on form, function, life coaching and how to handle the part of depression that makes one want to walk in front of a bus, without losing access to one’s creative spirit. We also speak with Athena Dixon, editor-in-chief and founder of Linden Avenue Lit, about where and how to find new voices of color, and the evolution of her writing from R&B fan fic to establishing a strong new literary magazine.

Show notes and links to people, places and things we’ve discussed are below. Next month, we’ll be talking with Ander Monson, editor-in-chief of Diagram, and Brian Doyle, author of Mink River.

Our episode sponsor is the recorded webinar, Developmental Editing for Fiction and Memoir – useful for authors and editors, and available at Editors Canada (note that the price is in CDN$).

Show Notes: Episode #3 People, Books and Places

Born and raised in NE Ohio, Athena Dixon has been writing for as long as she can remember. From her first short stories to her very first poem, My Dad is Grand, language has been an immeasurable influence on her life. Through her early days sharing her work in online poetry forums, to her days as an open mic poet, Athena has honed her voice into a carefully considered balance of everyday life, childhood memories, and exquisite wordplay. Athena is founder and editor-in-chief of Linden Avenue Literary Journal, a monthly online publication of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. She is also a poetry reviewer for Fifth Wednesday Journal. She writes, edits, and resides in Philadelphia.

Linden Avenue Literary

Citrine Magazine

Blavity

The Rising Phoenix Review

Major Jackson

Athena’s favorite poem, Euphoria by Major Jackson

Athena’s favorite Another Bad Creation song, Jealous Girl. (The band looks like they’re about 9 years old!)

Rick Moody was born in New York City. He attended Brown and Columbia universities. He has won awards including the Addison Metcalf Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the NAMI/ Ken Book Award, and the PEN Martha Albrand Prize for Excellence in Memoir. His short fiction and journalism have been featured in such work as Best American Stories 2001, Best American Essays 2004, and other anthologies. He has released multiple novels including The Ice Storm and Hotels of North America and the memoir The Black Veil, works of short fiction, music albums, and co-founded the Young Lions Book Award. He has taught at the State University of New York at Purchase, the Bennington College Writing Seminars, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife, daughter, and brand new baby son. Write him with your challenges at Rick Moody, Life Coach.
Metonymy: the substitution of the name of an attribute or adjunct for that of the thing meant, for example suit for business executive, or the track for horse racing.

Crossroads: the story of Robert Johnson and the Devil, on Radiolab

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Allison K Williams is a writer and editor based in Dubai, and the host of the Brevity Podcast.

Rick Moody’s Twitterature

March 4, 2010 § 1 Comment

In the “Gee, Brevity rocks, but why so many words?” category:

Electric Literature asked Rick Moody to write a story using just 140 characters at a time.  In other words, Twitter-ready.

Here is Moody talking about the experience on the blog, Future Perfect Publishing.

FPP: What inspired you to write a Twitter story?

RM: I think my contempt for Twitter is what inspired it, initially. In general, I think the way to describe the world is to get longer not shorter. Twitter, by virtue of brevity, abdicates any responsibility where real complexity is concerned, because it forbids length. This seemed to me like a challenge, then: how to get complex in a medium that is anathema to complexity and rigor. And a challenge is always thrilling.

FPP: What is the most difficult part of writing a story 140 characters at a time?

RM: That’s it’s 140 characters at a time! Is that not difficult enough? It’s very difficult to get real traction and real change into that space.

FPP: What is essential to carrying the story line in this new species of storytelling?

RM: I think you have to imply a lot of story because there’s just not that much action you can get into the character-count box. You can’t dramatize a scene so much on Twitter. Or, you have to cut up scenes into the little hunks available. To the extent that you can imply action rather than depicting it, you’ll have more room available for doing other bits of fictive work. Description, dialogue, character, and so on.

Moody’s story sits behind a $9.95 cent firewall, but you can read the opening excerpt here: Moody Does Twitter.

So we’re wondering if anyone wants to try this with nonfiction? Our pals at Creative Nonfiction have been running just such a contest, but we’re thinking we’d allow a total of 750 words, but in discreet 140 word segments, as Moody has done.

Thoughts?

via Rick Moody’s Novel Experiment with Microserialization « Future Perfect Publishing.

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