Revision and the Multi-Faceted Self

October 11, 2021 § 7 Comments

By Amy Beth Sisson

My sister recently sent me a photograph of a piece of paper that had hung on my parents’ bulletin board for decades. It was a poem I had written at age nine, and my current, much older self could not resist revising the words of my child self. Common advice to writers is to let a manuscript sit in between writing and revision, but my example is extreme—most don’t contemplate a fifty-year timespan. This experience made me question the relationship between writing, revision, and the self. 

Maybe the passage of time works to allow us to revise because of the nature of the self. Maybe the gap in time between writing and revision works because the passage of time allows for new facets of the self to come into focus; facets who can stand in more strongly for the reader rather than for the creator. 

Many writers, such as Anne Lamott, talk about this from the perspective of the creation of work. The idea that the revising self is different from the writing self is useful when sitting down to write a first draft. They recommend finding a way to turn off your inner critic. Various techniques are useful for getting into the creative and generative mindset such as free-writing, walking, and meditation. But how do you go about turning the critic back on when revising?

The word critic can mean a lot of different things. I don’t think it’s ever useful to summon the stereotypical teacher with a red pen. I prefer to think of my inner critic as a stand-in for my ideal imagined reader, the person I am trying to connect with. When revising, how can you shift your mind from the wildly creative to the place where you have empathy for the reader’s needs. What do the readers need to know, what might resonate with their experience, what will raise useful ideas and questions for them? When revising, I am striving to access deep empathy for the person interacting with my words.

So, if you can, put the manuscript in a virtual drawer for a time. Think about what the optimal length would be for you. Too long and the revising self might be too far from the material. Stephen King recommends taking a six-week break between drafting and revising. If you take this tack, be accepting of the vicissitudes of life that can interfere with connecting to the revision. Are any of us the same self as we were before the upheavals of 2020? And, of course, if you have a deadline all bets are off. 

Here are some things that have worked for me to get out of my head and into the reader’s. Most of these can be useful regardless of the genre.

  1. Move to another room. (I’d say go to a coffee shop if it were not for the Delta variant.) Have you ever gone into a room to do something only to find that you don’t know why you are there? Use this phenomenon to get in touch with your revising self.
  2. Try rewriting from a different point of view. When you drafted you consciously or unconsciously selected a point of view to tell the tale. Thinking about the story from another point of view can break you out of assumptions and bring you closer to the reader’s experience. Even if you don’t keep the revision’s point of view, it can inform the work.
  3. Try rewriting in a different tense. Changing tenses is a way to achieve a similar effect. If you switch from the present tense to the past tense you may give the reader more scope to understand the context of the events. If you switch from the past to the present tense you may give the reader more of a sense of immediacy. Again, you don’t have to keep this change, but it can be a useful exercise to help you have a new vision.
  4. Color code the piece in some way that helps you to see the structure of the work. Play with it.  Some people will highlight specific parts of speech. In longer works some people highlight themes or characters. This can give you a sense of the balance.
  5. Work on another genre. One of my critique partners, a short story writer, recently started revising a draft of a children’s book. She found that she was energized when she went back to revising her short story. Working on something for a very different audience helped her break out of her assumptions about her readers.

The next strategies I use help because they allow you to hear as well as see your words. I’m listing them in the order of my preference.

  1. Read it out loud. This is very helpful but sometimes I read what I think is on the page rather than what is really on the page and don’t even realize it. 
  2. Have the computer read it to you. This is slightly better for me because the computer will never fill in missing words, but the electric voice can be hard for me to focus on.
  3. Read it to someone. Having an actual person as my audience forces me to attend in a way that I don’t do when I’m alone.
  4. Have someone read it to you. This, for me, is the most effective strategy. I follow along on the page while my generous friend reads my words. I hear where they trip up. I hear where they feel awkward voicing something I wrote. If I can’t find a willing reader, Sometimes I will read something into a recording device on my phone and play back the recording.

Experiment with the ideas above to see what works for you to shift your perspective.

____

Amy Beth Sisson is struggling to emerge, toad-like, from the mud in a small town outside of Philly. Her poetry has appeared in Cleaver Magazine and The Night Heron Barks. Her fiction has appeared in The Best Short Stories of Philadelphia 2021Enchanted Conversation and Sweet Tree Review. This fall, she left her day job in software development and started an MFA in Poetry at Rutgers Camden. You can follow her work at amybethsisson.com

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§ 7 Responses to Revision and the Multi-Faceted Self

  • Nina Gaby says:

    Right on target. As I review a WIP with a new group, I realize I am a very different person that I was when I started. One suggestion that I also find very helpful- I read my pieces into my phone and listen back as if it were an Audio Book as I do something else. Great for catching cadence and ridiculous mistakes (of which I have many.)

  • abigail Thomas says:

    There are pieces I write in the third person when I need perspective, or I am no longer the person who experienced the moment I am writing about. I always read my stuff out loud, and when my voice goes dead, I know that it is either boring, or something is hiding behind the words that I need to dig into. When I print it out, I find printing it in a different font from the one I used composing it gives me another kind of distance. It’s almost as if somebody else wrote it, and I have a keener eye to revision. I never imagine a reader, though, it is only me I need to satisfy. Thank you for this very interesting essay! I love knowing how others deal with revision.

  • Stephanie Gibeault says:

    Excellent advice! I love the idea of putting myself in the reader’s mind when I put on my revision hat. It’s important to have practical techniques for switching the inner editor on and off, and these are fantastic! Having somebody read my work to me is my favourite.

  • Khoon Tha says:

    On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 at 5:33 PM BREVITY’s Nonfiction Blog wrote:

    > Guest Blogger posted: ” By Amy Beth Sisson My sister recently sent me a > photograph of a piece of paper that had hung on my parents’ bulletin board > for decades. It was a poem I had written at age nine, and my current, much > older self could not resist revising the word” >

  • kperrymn says:

    Thank you for this essay, Amy Beth. I belong to a writers group where we read each other”s work aloud. While we sometimes request other feedback, the main point of our meetings is to hear our work read aloud by someone else. It helps a lot! I so appreciate your generously offering your revision tips too.

  • accessamy says:

    Loving this generous dose of practical wisdom, Amy. Thank you.

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